Archives pour l'étiquette mental

the convergence

Your personal sound eventually results from many convergences, here are a few of them :
– your body and your instrument,
your body and the ground,
inhalation and exhalation,
your air column and your diaphragm,
your inner ear and your vocal cords,
your neck and your waist back,
your embouchure and your sound source,
your sound source and your heels,
your sound and your musical ideas,
and more globally, your own mental images and their subsequent physical support, like your trunk bottom and your verticality feeling, as Alfred Tomatis explains it in The Ear And The Voice.

As described in “air and breathing“, you may visualize that global convergence in your lower back, making you vibrate and forget about blowing, hence avoiding any disturbing stress : the control of the mental power on this matter is outlined in George Kochevitsky’s Art Of Piano Playing.

By freeing the tranverse abdominus muscle and letting it press on your “buoy“ surrounding your pelvis, you can then feel your internal sound flowing down to the ground (another proprioceptive image), and realize that you burn very little air. Such a richest vibration is produced from the optimal configuration of this transverse abdominus, seized at its lowest position thanks to letting it loose at the very end of your natural inhaling : the real sound is laid at this very moment, flowing down through your heels and spreading during this non-pushed exhaling.

The efficiency of those many convergences actually leads you to master your musical expression, together with achieving self-confidence and physical well-being : so radiates Dominique Hoppenot ‘s Inner Violin / Le violon intérieur.


Be indivisible.
Pull your neck from your back waist.
Build up musical phrases and
not a number of notes.

Robert Pichaureau, Favorite Expressions
(translated by Guy Robert)


Your body/mind fusion appears as THE device making EVERYTHING work together.

Michel RicquierL’utilisation des ressources intérieures
(translated by Guy Robert)


The inner ear works in combination with the nervous system and brain in order to issue commands to the vocal cords.

David LiebmanDeveloping a Personal Saxophone Sound


Try to build your solos.

Phil WoodsMaster Class at New York University


Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom.
If you don’t live it, it won’t come out your horn.

Charlie ParkerThe Official Web Site of Charlie Parker

sensations through piano

Stabilizing your mental images associated to your proprioceptions helps you to reproduce your body preparation at your will, hence reinforcing your self-confidence. Then, your body should remain ready to vibrate, from its prepared state, allowing you to picture your own image associated to the vibration laying and sounding : from that point on, your sensations develop, among them your being seated on your sound center. That ensures the continuity of the tone, as if it were radiating from your heels.

Such an approach is indeed valid for any instrument, the piano among them, and has a direct impact on your live technique, coming out through your fingers (and combined with the tongue articulation of the wind players).

During that process, as Robert Pichaureau used to say, “You should behave like a statue ! “ and “Mastering your inner vibration is a treat“. This way, you realize how practicing your instrument becomes enjoyable.


[Ludwig Deppe (1828-1890) wrote that tone must be produced, not by finger stroke (…) but by coordinated action of all parts of the arm.]

Ludwig Deppe required her [Amy Fay, one of his pupils] to follow consciously the duration of each tone, to imagine the pitch and volume of the next one, and only then to transfer very carefully from that tone to the next.


And until there is a connection between the inner musical imagination, the innervation of movement, muscular sensations, and careful and critical listening to the results, no form of movement is of practical value.


So movements in piano practicing differ, sometimes considerably, from those in piano playing. In the first case we have to consider not only artistic purpose but physiological points as well.


(…) the main materials for the building of piano technique are the proprioceptive sensations. Hence lack of clearness in these sensations from finger activity will inevitably result in indistinct finger technique.


The player must receive a clear proprioceptive sensation from each movement, sensation which does not coalesce with the sensation from the next movement, and is not suppressed by it.


George Kochevitsky, The Art Of Piano Playing

the instrument

The musical instrument, whether it uses wind, strings or skins, acts as an amplifier of the musician’s voice directly driven by his inner vibration : to take advantage of this amplifier’s acoustics, the player aims at stimulating its resonance, and at merging with the vibration inside his body, radiating from his sound source and modulated by his vocal cords.

As Alfred Tomatis describes it in The Ear And The Voice, he must sing, hence vibrate, in order to feed his instrument and make it sound and resonate. In the case of wind players, the air column obviously comes to mind, and remains at the core of playing any other type of instrument, as Dominique Hoppenot shows it in her Inner Violin / Le violon intérieur .

More precisely, when the woodwind player lets his clarinet vibrate, after having stabilized his sound on the saxophone, he gets a better mastery from this approach, with respect to the somewhat different tension of the sound, considering the air column should develop the same way in a well centered and verticalized manner, in order to obtain the much sought-after playing ease. In his Art Of Piano Playing, George Kochevitsky describes this easiness sensation as resulting from the mental control of the playing apparatus, showing that your musical idea drives your instrument playing.


Many years of solitary introspection lead me to analyze and to understand the unconscious operations of our body, when we vibrate an instrument.

(…) you should be aware of everything which must be achieved before playing a sound : here is the real work. To achieve this : refrain from holding the instrument in your hands.

Robert Pichaureau
(translated by Guy Robert)


Your body is your real instrument.

Robert Pichaureau, Favorite Expressions
(translated by Guy Robert)


The horn is like a megaphone which amplifies the sound wave set up by the vocal cords and reed vibration. Air, even air lying still in the horn itself, becomes sound.

David Liebman,
Developing a Personal Saxophone Sound


You find the center of that horn for your physionomy : the node, what makes it vibrate, you know, and when you find it, it’s there.

Phil Woods,
Master Class at New York University


The clarinet disappears, and I disappear and all you hear is music. (…) It’s playing so great that I forget there is a clarinet.

The  clarinet is leading me. (…) Sometimes the clarinet is playing me ; sometimes I think I’m playing the clarinet : that’s when it’s wrong ! When you think you’re playing the clarinet, already there’s too much separation between you and the clarinet, and then it’s not really happening (…) like when it’s just the music.

Eddie Daniels, in
A Few Moments with Eddie Daniels,
Eddie Daniels on The Art of Noodling

The Musician Sound

My exploring the alto sax, coming from the clarinet, made me realize how paramount the sound foundation is, as resulting from the mastering of my inner vibration : by avoiding any physical stress disturbing the musical gesture (“body tensions shrink your sound“, as Marie-Christine Mathieu shows it), we manage to merge with our instrument.

In other words, the expression is fully controlled when the body fades out behind the sound. Then, the playing process of the body-instrument set becomes flexibly driven by the musician, who can then concentrate on his musical speech since his sound is already put in place : from this point onwards, other musical features logically build up, such as articulation, nuances, rests…

Sound_EN

Many findings result from this approach, which was happily taught to me by Master Robert Pichaureau some years ago (1983-85) and is feeding my personal routine in a continuous way : practice and assimilation make concepts ripe with time, so that they become obvious. Along these lines, this great teacher helped many musicians to unveil and (re-)build up their sound, enhancing these principles in a unified way for all types of instruments (he used to refer to The Inner Violin / Le violon intérieur of Dominique Hoppenot, extending the concept beyond the brass and woodwind players…).

Le Traité méthodique de pédagogie instrumentale, written by Michel Ricquier, also shows and explains the sound produced by the brass or the woodwind player. As a complement, the paramount role of mind for the art expression is developed in his book L’utilisation de vos ressources intérieures.

In the USA, Joe Allard was a notorious Master, as a clarinet and saxophone player, who educated several generations of musicians, following similar principles, from whom I further mention excerpts consistent with my observations. David Liebman is one of his famous followers, who elaborated his ideas about the development of a personal saxophone sound.

These teachings are feeding my understanding, following the milestones selected in the left sidebar in a personal fashion, describing my feelings (and proprioceptions) stemming from a progressive assimilation of the Pichaureau method and comparable concepts : each page outlines appropriate excerpts related to the current theme.

Great musicians of all styles demonstrate as many embodiments of personal sound. Among the most significant ones to me, we can find Charlie Parker, Phil Woods, Cannonball Adderley, David LiebmanEddie Daniels, Miles Davis, Chet Baker, Clark TerryPierrick Pédron, Jean-Charles Richard, Géraldine LaurentMartin Fröst, Romain GuyotMaurice André, Timofei Dokshitser, Guy Touvron


In the first place, you should learn to know yourself : learn to be aware of everything which must be achieved before playing a sound.

Robert Pichaureau
(translated by Guy Robert)


If you know how to play, if you understand your approach, then you have a good plan for your playing. You eliminate much of the fear of playing. There’s still concern because you want to play well, but you’re not afraid to blow.

Joe Allard


In truth, there are no rules, only concepts. In all honesty, it took me years to understand some of his directions. This was especially true for the all-important overtone exercises and their significance. It finally dawned on me during my twenties how much the tone of the great players evidenced ease of production, evenness of sound, a rich and deep sonority, and most of all, personal expressiveness.

David LiebmanDeveloping a Personal Saxophone Sound

 

convergence

Le son personnel résulte donc de convergences multiples, entre :
– le corps et l’instrument,
– le corps et le sol,
– l’inspiration et l’expiration,
– la colonne d’air et le diaphragme,
– l’oreille interne et les cordes vocales,
– la nuque et les reins,
– l’embouchure et la source du son,
– la source du son et les talons,
– le son et les idées musicales,
et plus globalement, entre les propres images mentales et le contrôle physique qu’elles orientent, comme le bassin et la verticalité, ainsi qu’on le voit dans L’oreille et la voix d’Alfred Tomatis.

Comme illustré dans “air et respiration“, l’image de cette convergence globale est centrée au bas du dos, elle nous fait oublier de souffler pour plutôt vibrer, et évite du même coup toute contraction perturbatrice : le contrôle mental de ce processus est mis en évidence par George Kochevitsky dans The Art Of Piano Playing.

En libérant le muscle transverse pour le laisser peser sur la “bouée“ autour du bassin, la sensation du son  se propage  vers le sol et ne requiert qu’une consommation d’air minimale. Cette riche vibration est générée à partir de la position optimale de ce muscle transverse, captée au plus bas grâce au lâcher-prise en fin d’inspiration naturelle : c’est l’instant précis de la pose du bon son, qui coule dans les talons et se développe pendant l’expiration non poussée.

La confiance en soi et le bien-être physique se renforcent dans cette convergence globale, rendant l’expression musicale pleinement vécue, comme rayonne Le violon intérieur de Dominique Hoppenot.


Être indivisible.
Tirer la nuque avec les reins.
Faire des phrases et non des notes.

Robert Pichaureau, Expressions favorites


L’unité corps/mental est LA machine qui fait TOUT fonctionner.

Michel RicquierL’utilisation des ressources intérieures


The inner ear works in combination with the nervous system and brain in order to issue commands to the vocal cords.

David LiebmanDeveloping a Personal Saxophone Sound


Try to build your solos.

Phil WoodsMaster Class at New York University


Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom.
If you don’t live it, it won’t come out your horn.

Charlie ParkerThe Official Web Site of Charlie Parker

les sensations par le piano

La stabilisation des images mentales proprioceptives facilite la reproduction à la demande du conditionnement du corps, renforçant ainsi la confiance en soi. Ensuite, le corps préparé reste disponible pour la vibration, en laissant se développer les images associées à la pose du son et à son rayonnement : parmi les sensations ressenties, celle d’être assis au centre du son reste essentielle pour la continuité de l’intonation, comme si elle émanait des talons.

Cette approche est bien entendu valide pour tout instrument, le piano en particulier, et a une influence directe sur la technique du jeu, produite par les doigts (et combinée avec l’articulation  de la langue des instrumentistes à vent).

Durant ce processus, comme Robert Pichaureau aimait à le répéter, “Il faut se comporter comme une statue“, et il concluait “Maîtriser sa vibration interne est un régal“. On comprend ainsi comment le travail instrumental peut être source de jouissance.


[Ludwig Deppe (1828-1890) écrivit  que le son doit être produit non pas par l’action des doigts, mais par le mouvement coordonné des constituants du bras.]
Ludwig Deppe attendait d’elle [Amy Fay, l’une de ses élèves] qu’elle écoute attentivement chaque note dans toute sa durée, en imaginant la hauteur et l’intensité de la suivante, et alors seulement de passer avec précaution de l’une à l’autre.


Et tant que la convergence n’est pas réalisée entre l’intention musicale, la commande du mouvement, les sensations correspondantes et l’écoute discriminante du résultat, aucun geste n’est pertinent.


Ainsi les gestes du pianiste en séance de travail sont-ils différents, parfois considérablement, de ceux accomplis en situation de concert. En effet, dans le premier cas, on doit prendre en compte non seulement l’objectif artistique, mais aussi les aspects physiologiques.


(…) les éléments de base du développement de la technique pianistique sont les sensations proprioceptives. Par suite, toute imprécision dans ces sensations émanant de l’activité digitale résulte à coup sûr en une technique imprécise à ce niveau-là.


L’instrumentiste doit percevoir une sensation proprioceptive bien définie pour chaque mouvement, qui ne doit pas se confondre avec la suivante, ni être estompée par elle.


George Kochevitsky, The Art Of Piano Playing
(traduit par Guy Robert)

instrument

L’instrument, qu’il soit à vent, à cordes, à peaux, joue pleinement son rôle en amplifiant la voix du musicien, expression directe de sa vibration intérieure : pour tirer parti de l’acoustique de cet amplificateur, l’instrumentiste vise à en stimuler la résonance, à partir de la vibration interne à son corps, émise à la source du son, puis modulée par ses cordes vocales.

Ainsi que l’explique Alfred Tomatis dans L’oreille et la voix, il doit chanter, c’est-à-dire vibrer, pour alimenter son instrument et le faire (ré)sonner. Dans le cas des instrumentistes à vent, la colonne d’air vient évidemment à l’esprit, mais elle reste essentielle avec tout autre instrument, comme Le violon intérieur de Dominique Hoppenot.

En particulier, lorsqu’on fait vibrer la clarinette, après avoir stabilisé sa sonorité au saxophone, cette approche donne du recul par rapport à la tension différente de la matière sonore : on doit être centré et verticalisé dans sa colonne d’air de la même façon pour les deux instruments, afin d’obtenir l’aisance recherchée. Dans son ouvrage The Art Of Piano Playing, George Kochevitsky décrit cette sensation d’aisance comme le résultat du contrôle mental sur le moyen d’expression (i.e. le corps du musicien), montrant comment l’idée musicale pilote le jeu sur l’instrument.


Des années de recherche solitaire m’ont conduit à analyser et à comprendre le travail inconscient de notre corps, lorsque nous faisons vibrer un instrument.

(…) prendre conscience de tout ce qui doit se faire avant d’en venir à émettre un son : voilà le vrai travail. Pour cela : éviter d’avoir l’instrument dans  les mains.

Robert Pichaureau


Le véritable instrument est le corps.

Robert Pichaureau, Expressions favorites


The horn is like a megaphone which amplifies the sound wave set up by the vocal cords and reed vibration. Air, even air lying still in the horn itself, becomes sound.

David LiebmanDeveloping a Personal Saxophone Sound


You find the center of that horn for your physionomy : the node, what makes it vibrate, you know, and when you find it, it’s there.

Phil WoodsMaster Class at New York University


The clarinet disappears, and I disappear and all you hear is music. (…) It’s playing so great that I forget there is a clarinet.

The  clarinet is leading me. (…) Sometimes the clarinet is playing me ; sometimes I think I’m playing the clarinet : that’s when it’s wrong ! When you think you’re playing the clarinet, already there’s too much separation between you and the clarinet, and then it’s not really happening (…) like when it’s just the music.

Eddie Daniels, in
A Few Moments with Eddie Daniels,
Eddie Daniels on The Art of Noodling

Le son du musicien

En découvrant le sax alto, après la clarinette, j’ai pris conscience de la nécessaire fondation du son, résultant de la maîtrise de la vibration intérieure au corps : en évitant toute contraction physique perturbant le geste musical (“les tensions rétrécissent le son“, comme le montre Marie-Christine Mathieu), on arrive justement à “faire corps“ avec son instrument.

En d’autres termes, l’expression est maîtrisée dès que le corps s’efface derrière le son. Ainsi, le jeu de l’ensemble corps-instrument devient malléable, souple et contrôlable par le musicien, qui peut d’emblée se concentrer sur son discours, car le son est déjà installé (ou “placé “), sur lequel le reste se construit logiquement : l’articulation, les nuances, les silences…

LeSon

De nombreux constats découlent de cette approche, dont les préceptes me furent enseignés et démontrés par le maître Robert Pichaureau il y a quelques années (1983-85), et me nourrissent de façon continue et renouvelée : avec le temps, l’exercice et l’assimilation, les concepts mûrissent et s’éclaircissent pour devenir évidents. Ce grand pédagogue a aidé de nombreux musiciens à découvrir et à (re)construire leur son, en déclinant ces principes de façon unifiée pour tout instrument (il citait souvent Le violon intérieur de Dominique Hoppenot, pour aller au-delà des soufflants…).

Le Traité méthodique de pédagogie instrumentale, écrit par Michel Ricquier permet aussi de comprendre et de dérouler la production du son de l’instrumentiste à vent. En complément, le rôle essentiel du mental pour l’expression artistique est développé dans son ouvrage L’utilisation de vos ressources intérieures.

Aux États-Unis, Joe Allard fut un illustre maître, clarinettiste et saxophoniste, qui a formé plusieurs générations de musiciens selon des principes analogues, dont je cite des extraits en rapport avec mes observations. David Liebman est l’un de ses célèbres disciples, qui a plus tard formalisé ses idées sur le développement d’un son personnel au saxophone.

Ces enseignements alimentent mon interprétation, articulée autour des thèmes présentés ci-contre, sélectionnés à ma façon, selon mes perceptions (et proprioceptions) résultant d’une assimilation raisonnée de la méthode Pichaureau et d’autres concepts similaires : chaque page propose des citations appropriées, en rapport avec le thème développé.

Les grands musiciens de tous styles représentent autant de démonstrations vivantes du son personnalisé. Je citerais, parmi les plus significatifs pour moi, Charlie Parker, Phil Woods, Cannonball Adderley, David LiebmanEddie Daniels, Miles Davis, Chet Baker, Clark Terry, Pierrick Pédron, Jean-Charles Richard, Géraldine LaurentMartin Fröst, Romain GuyotMaurice André, Timofei Dokshitser, Guy Touvron


Il faut en tout premier lieu, apprendre à se connaître : à prendre conscience de tout ce qui doit se faire avant d’en venir à émettre un son.

Robert Pichaureau


If you know how to play, if you understand your approach, then you have a good plan for your playing. You eliminate much of the fear of playing. There’s still concern because you want to play well, but you’re not afraid to blow.

Joe Allard


In truth, there are no rules, only concepts. In all honesty, it took me years to understand some of his directions. This was especially true for the all-important overtone exercises and their significance. It finally dawned on me during my twenties how much the tone of the great players evidenced ease of production, evenness of sound, a rich and deep sonority, and most of all, personal expressiveness.

David LiebmanDeveloping a Personal Saxophone Sound